Prejudice in Writing: Where I’m Coming From

Why is talking about prejudice important? Why do I think need to talk about prejudice? If you read my last post in this series (also known as my first post, which you can find here), you can see a few reasons why I think prejudice is something we need to talk about. Now I’ll talk briefly about why I think I should talk about it.

It’s easy: because I want to write. Because I do write.

This is a topic that is a part of my writing experience. Just because it’s a topic that may cause people to fling digital mud at me doesn’t mean that I shouldn’t talk about it. That is cowardly, and I try very hard not to be cowardly. Or I just have a big mouth. I’m never quite sure.

In my family we have arguments, a lot of them. At my (Catholic) school we were encouraged to discuss difficult topics: we talked about abortion, marriage, sex, drugs, alcohol, religion and everything else you could imagine (but wouldn’t think happened at a Catholic high school). My friends and I regularly call each other ridiculous during late-night “conversations.”

It helps me to be open-minded, which is a good quality in a creative person. I want to take everything in. I want more information. I want more points of view, more opinions. I think it makes me a better writer. I think it makes me a better person.

I won’t lie: this will be difficult and I may say some things that frustrate or upset you, but I’m willing to listen. This isn’t supposed to be me shouting into the abyss. If I wanted that, I’d keep a journal. So, let me know what you think.

Do you talk about difficult things with people you trust? How about online? Do you think prejudice (in writing and reading, specifically) is something we should talk about?

 

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Seems I Lost My Voice

Sorry everyone. I didn’t check up on– well, you don’t really need to know exactly how bad I am at using my computer. It’s embarrassing for someone who is in her early-twenties. At any rate, I posted a blank post without meaning to and I am so very sorry. I’ll try not to let it happen again, but I doubt the truth of that statement.

If you’d like to actually read the post I wrote, you can click on the link here. It’s a nice little post about finding my voice and what I hope for those authors who are looking for their voices. Otherwise, I hope you stick around for my next post on Thursday. I promise it’s finished (I double-checked).

Thanks for your forgiveness and your… sticking-around-ness ahead of time. I’ll see you on Thursday.

I Really Sound Like That?

There are quite a few studies out there that say that most people don’t like the sound of their own voices. Most of those studies also explain why precisely we don’t (it has something to do with the difference in how we hear ourselves when speaking and how we hear recorded sounds), but that doesn’t matter in this post. In this post I’m going to talk about finding my blogging voice.

I’m sure I’ve mentioned it before, but I am a wordy person. Some (most) would say that I can be pedantic, even. Usually they’re right. There are a lot of random facts rolling around in my skull and I can get distracted by them, so I end up rambling. I hope to cut down on that — at least in writing.

When I first started blogging I was worried about sounding like an idiot (I don’t know why; I’m usually quite smart), and that translated into being wordy in a much less entertaining fashion than I normally am. Since then I’ve relaxed a bit and I’m becoming wordy in a way that I hope is much more entertaining. Hopefully.

Finding your voice is one of the things that’s shouted at beginning writers almost as often as “Write what you know.” It’s also one of the hardest things to find because the only way you can really find your voice is to write. Just like most other forms of art, we need to practice to get good at it.

But, really, what is “voice”?

It’s you. Voice is how you put yourself into your writing that makes it unique to you. Not on any sort of conscious level,  although it can be downplayed or emphasized on purpose. Your voice is the soul of your writing, it’s your soul put into the written word. Don’t hide who you are in your writing; that’s what readers remember.

My favorite authors (and bloggers) all have distinct, developed voices that I can identify in moments. This is what I hope to find for myself. Even if I’m never a great or even a good writer, I want a part of my soul to show in how I write. I want the people who know me best in my personal life to be able to tell that these are my words, and I don’t want people I meet online to be disappointed by me in real life.

Have you found your voice yet? How did you? Do you think I sound interesting or would you like to hit me over the head with something very heavy just to shut me up? (It’s more understandable than you may think.)

 

**I’m an idiot. Mostly I’m an idiot technologically. Sorry to everyone who read the first (non) draft. This is the one I intended to post.**